Courses

In order to equip students with the tools that can help them become better global citizens and to empower them in an increasingly globalized world, CGEN offers certificates at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Those certificates are awarded upon completion of certain courses which foster students’ understanding of innovation, global challenges, social enterprise and the barriers to global development, including cultural gaps and social inequalities. Both certificates are available to students enrolled in any engineering department at the University of Toronto and their requisite courses draw on faculty from the Department of Applied Science and Engineering, the Munk School for Global Affairs, the Dalla Lana School for Public Health, the Rotman School of Management, and others.

Undergraduate: Engineering & Globalization (Global) Certificate

The requirements for a Global Engineering Certificate in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

Two of the following courses:

This course presents and discusses a broad range of global energy systems (including electricity generation, electricity end use, transportation and infrastructure) that are emerging based on two key trends: (a) the increasing ability to deploy technologies and engineering systems globally, and (b) innovative organizations, many driven by entrepreneurship (for profit and social) and entrepreneurial finance techniques.  The course considers these types of innovations in the context of developed economies, rapidly developing economies such as India and China, and the developing world.  The course will interweave a mix of industry examples and more in-depth case studies.  The result will be a matrix (not necessarily completely filled in) along the three dimensions of type of technologies, types of organizational structure, and development level of the country or region.  The examples and cases are examined with various engineering, business and environmental/sustainability analysis perspectives.

This is a joint graduate/undergraduate course, which explores a broad range of topics centered on the role of technology and engineering in global development.  The course format is a combination of lectures by the instructor and guest speakers, discussion of assigned readings (academic journals, book excerpts, popular press, etc.), review of case studies, and student presentations. Topics covered include: (1) a brief history of international development, foreign aid, and major players involved (e.g. UN, World Bank, government agencies, NGOs), (2) technological innovation and diffusion theory and practice, (3) new international development models (e.g. social entrepreneurship, microfinance, risk capital approaches) and finance organizations involved (e.g. Grameen Bank, Gates Foundation, Acumen Fund, etc.), (4) implication of major global trends (e.g. globalization, urbanization) for sustainable development.  The above topics are addressed in the context of specific case studies of technologies and technology sectors involving health, energy, infrastructure, finance, and communications. The goal of this course is to inform students of the various causes and consequences of global poverty, and to highlight ways that they can apply their technical, engineering, and entrepreneurship knowledge towards addressing complex global challenges.

This course focuses on engineering design within the context of global society by emphasizing the needs of users in order to support appropriate, sustainable technology. A design project will comprise the major component of the course work.  The course will take the approach of “design for X”.   Students are expected to be familiar with design for functionality, safety, robustness, etc.  This course will extend the students’ understanding of design methodologies to design for “appropriateness in developing regions”.   Readings and discussions will explore the social, cultural, economic, educational, environmental and political contexts in which third world end users relate to technology.   Students will then incorporate their deepened understanding of this context in their design project.   The projects will be analyzed for functionality as well as appropriateness and sustainability in the third world context.   Upon completion of the course, students should have a deeper appreciation of the meaning of appropriate technology in various international development sectors such as healthcare, water & sanitation, land management, energy, infrastructure, and communications in both urban and rural settings.

One elective from the following courses:

A course focused on recent anthropological scholarship that seeks to understand and explain the transformation of contemporary societies and cultures. Topics may include some of the following: new patterns of global inequality, war and neo-colonialism, health and globalization, social justice and indigeneity, religious fundamentalism, gender inequalities, biotechnologies and society etc.

Approaches to environmental concerns are often marked by assumptions that reflect distinct worldviews positing particular understandings of the role of the human with respect to nature. This course explores sundry economic, political, scientific, religious, and moral worldviews pertaining to the environment, including environmental ethics, Gaia, ecofeminism, scientific cosmology, and aboriginal perspectives.

Most urban courses taught in the English-speaking world implicitly or explicitly focus on large North American, European, or Australian cities. While these places are interesting in their own right, studying them as the sole model of urbanization is misleading. To a great extent, the societies of the westernized, developed world are already highly-urbanized and have been so for decades. Cities outside of this sphere, by contrast, are generally growing much faster, and experiencing greater social and economic upheaval as a result. Understanding non-North American urbanization is a vital part of understanding cities in general. This course is an attempt to introduce students to processes of urbanization that are occurring in places other than North America. There will be a particular focus on comparing the urban form, economies, and social life in cities around the world.

Focusing on the impacts that global flows of ideas, culture, people, goods, and capital have on cities throughout the globe, this course explores some of the factors that differentiate the experiences of globalization and urban change in cities at different moments in history and in various geographic locations.

A survey of the developmental challenges facing societies in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and Africa, and the efficacy of various development strategies and policies in meeting these challenges.

The course analyzes the impact of the individual, the nation-state, and the international and transnational systems on international conflict and conflict resolution, and examines the major problems the international community confronts in a rapidly changing international environment.

Students examine the impact of contemporary globalization on Canada, and for Canadas place in the world. The course is interdisciplinary in its approach and addresses globalization from a wide range of perspectives, including mobility, trade, urbanization, health, religion, environmental change, technology, communications, and the arts.


Graduate: Certificate in Global Engineering

Students must complete the equivalent of two full courses (four half courses) from those listed below, with at least one full course equivalent (or two half courses) chosen from Category A.

This course presents and discusses a broad range of global energy systems (including electricity generation, electricity end use, transportation and infrastructure) that are emerging based on two key trends: (a) the increasing ability to deploy technologies and engineering systems globally, and (b) innovative organizations, many driven by entrepreneurship (for profit and social) and entrepreneurial finance techniques.  The course considers these types of innovations in the context of developed economies, rapidly developing economies such as India and China, and the developing world.  The course will interweave a mix of industry examples and more in-depth case studies.  The result will be a matrix (not necessarily completely filled in) along the three dimensions of type of technologies, types of organizational structure, and development level of the country or region.  The examples and cases are examined with various engineering, business and environmental/sustainability analysis perspectives.

This is a joint graduate/undergraduate course, which explores a broad range of topics centered on the role of technology and engineering in global development.  The course format is a combination of lectures by the instructor and guest speakers, discussion of assigned readings (academic journals, book excerpts, popular press, etc.), review of case studies, and student presentations. Topics covered include: (1) a brief history of international development, foreign aid, and major players involved (e.g. UN, World Bank, government agencies, NGOs), (2) technological innovation and diffusion theory and practice, (3) new international development models (e.g. social entrepreneurship, microfinance, risk capital approaches) and finance organizations involved (e.g. Grameen Bank, Gates Foundation, Acumen Fund, etc.), (4) implication of major global trends (e.g. globalization, urbanization) for sustainable development.  The above topics are addressed in the context of specific case studies of technologies and technology sectors involving health, energy, infrastructure, finance, and communications. The goal of this course is to inform students of the various causes and consequences of global poverty, and to highlight ways that they can apply their technical, engineering, and entrepreneurship knowledge towards addressing complex global challenges.

This course focuses on engineering design within the context of global society by emphasizing the needs of users in order to support appropriate, sustainable technology. A design project will comprise the major component of the course work.  The course will take the approach of “design for X”.   Students are expected to be familiar with design for functionality, safety, robustness, etc.  This course will extend the students’ understanding of design methodologies to design for “appropriateness in developing regions”.   Readings and discussions will explore the social, cultural, economic, educational, environmental and political contexts in which third world end users relate to technology.   Students will then incorporate their deepened understanding of this context in their design project.   The projects will be analyzed for functionality as well as appropriateness and sustainability in the third world context.   Upon completion of the course, students should have a deeper appreciation of the meaning of appropriate technology in various international development sectors such as healthcare, water & sanitation, land management, energy, infrastructure, and communications in both urban and rural settings.

In order to create sustainable solutions to the world’s most important challenges, global development professionals must reach beyond the traditional boundaries of their field of expertise combining scientific/technological, business, and social ideas in an approach known as integrated innovation.   In this project-based course, students from multiple disciplines (engineering, management, health and social sciences) will work together – using participatory methods with an international partner – to address a locally relevant challenge.  Students will be expected to communicate with and understand team members from other disciplines, integrate their knowledge and experience of global issues in order to: (a) identify and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of existing technical approaches to addressing the challenge, (b) analyze the characteristics of existing social frameworks (ethical, cultural, business, political) (c) identify gaps and needs (d) propose an appropriate integrated solution approach that incorporates an analysis of the challenge through these disparate lenses. The final deliverables for addressing the challenge at the end of the school year will include:  a prototype of the end product, a business plan, a policy analysis, and analysis of impact on global health.

Students will learn the basic concepts to be considered when growing businesses via entering into foreign markets, and internationalizing entrepreneurial companies. The course is an introduction to global entrepreneurship; managing global strategy; diversifying, acquiring, and restructuring across borders; governing the corporation around the globe; making alliances and acquisitions work; understanding how institutions and resources affect the liability of foreigners; and managing corporate social responsibility within a global content. There will be example cases of how companies throughout the world, including Brazil, China and India have expanded globally. For a better understanding of the international arena while internationalizing entrepreneurial companies, there will also be a brief review of some recent global developments, including the current impact of the 2009 global economic crisis.

Students will learn the basic concepts to be considered when growing businesses via entering into foreign markets, and internationalizing entrepreneurial companies. The course is an introduction to global entrepreneurship; managing global strategy; diversifying, acquiring, and restructuring across borders; governing the corporation around the globe; making alliances and acquisitions work; understanding how institutions and resources affect the liability of foreigners; and managing corporate social responsibility within a global content. There will be example cases of how companies throughout the world, including Brazil, China and India have expanded globally. For a better understanding of the international arena while internationalizing entrepreneurial companies, there will also be a brief review of some recent global developments, including the current impact of the 2009 global economic crisis.

Planning for resilience is a fundamental of strategic and operational planning of infrastructure and requires an in-depth understanding of the operation one wishes to make resilient, its context and operating environment. This course teaches resilience planning from first principles, including the development and application of international and Canadian infrastructure resilience and investment policy, demand and dependency management, all-hazards and mitigation strategies and its relationship to Enterprise Risk Management and Business Continuity Planning.

This course is designed for engineering students interested in starting a business venture that advances social and/or environmental good. The course provides students with as real a “social entrepreneurship” experience as is possible within a course setting – students will, independently or in groups, construct a Business Model for their entrepreneurial idea, and will pitch their model to a panel of Angel investors. Most lectures will run workshop-style: industry experts (in social marketing, social finance, HR, law and other fields), along with real social entrepreneurs, will work one-on-one with students to help refine their business models in preparation for the investment pitch. Other lectures, along with course readings, will focus on understanding the field of social entrepreneurship, with a particular emphasis on topics relevant to engineering such as clean tech commercialization and the growing field of “impact investing”

As urban populations grow, cities need to provide basic services (e.g. water, sanitation, public safety, transit) and address the negative externalities associated with rapid growth (e.g. air and water pollution, congestion). Ultimately, cities will have to find the fiscal resources to pay for services and infrastructure. This course will provide an introduction to data analytics and show how these tools can be applied to a variety of city problems such as transportation gridlock, shortage of affordable housing, deteriorating water and sewer infrastructure, inadequate fiscal resources, and other problems. Each problem will be described, ways to approach the problem from a data analytics perspective will be determined, and the type of data available to analyze the problem and work toward solutions will be identified.

This course focuses on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in low income settings from an environmental health perspective. With respect to water, the course will cover drinking water quality and quantity, water access, and appropriate water treatment and storage options. With respect to sanitation, the course will cover low cost decentralized sanitation, promotion of sanitation, gender, and sanitation in challenging environments. Hygiene topics will include disease transmission, and theory and practice of hygiene behavior, education and change.

 

*Graphic by anbileru adaleru